You are here: Home / Publications / Selected publications

Selected publications

Selected ECN-related publications

Climate change impacts: Evidence from ECN sites

This publication highlights some of the findings from ECN monitoring and research which provide evidence of the sensitivity of natural ecosystems in the UK to variability and change in climate

Climate change impacts: Evidence from ECN sites - Read More…

Vegetation exerts a greater control on litter decomposition than climate warming in peatlands

To compare the effects of climate warming and vegetation change on decomposition and carbon accumulation, the team led by Sue Ward (Lancaster University) conducted an experiment on peatland at the Moor House-Upper Teesdale ECN site in the North Pennines. ECN meteorological data were used.

Vegetation exerts a greater control on litter decomposition than climate warming in peatlands - Read More…

A new approach to modelling the relationship between annual population abundance indices and weather data

This paper on the relationship between weather and fluctuations in species' population sizes uses data from a range of sources including moth data collected at ECN terrestrial sites and contributed to the Rothamsted Insect Survey.

A new approach to modelling the relationship between annual population abundance indices and weather data - Read More…

Modelling impacts of atmospheric deposition and temperature on long-term DOC trends

ECN and the Forest Level II monitoring network are the UK’s only source of information on long-term change in soil water chemistry. In this study, soil solution chemistry data from three upland ECN sites and three UK ICP Forest Level II sites were modelled using the dynamic soil chemistry model, MADOC, which simulates long-term changes in carbon and nitrogen cycling and soil acidity. Results suggest that future dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations may exceed preindustrial levels due to nitrogen pollution, which has implications for drinking water catchment management.

Modelling impacts of atmospheric deposition and temperature on long-term DOC trends - Read More…