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Meteorology

Introduction to the ECN meteorology protocol (M)
code

M

Protocol file

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Site types that use this protocol

Terrestrial

Climate is not constant: records over the last two centuries have shown that both long-term trends and short-term perturbations in climate can occur.  There is concern that human activities may be inadvertently changing the earth's climate through an enhanced 'greenhouse effect', by continuing emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases which will cause the temperature of the earth's surface to increase.  The local impact of these global changes in climate is not yet known.  Climatic conditions, particularly temperature and rainfall, probably provide the most important constraint on ecological processes; a knowledge of long-term changes in climate therefore provides the starting point for any analysis of changes in ecosystem structure and dynamics at a site.

The Meteorology protocol consists of two differing approaches:

  • Automatic Weather Stations (MA)  | More...
  • Standard Meteorological Observations (manual meteorology) (MM)  | More...

Our field activities

SEPTEMBER

This is the last of the busy months in terms of field work at terrestrial sites as the season for monitoring butterflies, frogs, grazing animals and bats draws to an end. In rivers and lakes we sample diatoms for the third time in the year. The usual year-round measurements are also made.

See all this month's field measurements...

Loch Neagh